So is that what it takes to be a “faith-based” organization now? In some ways, it appears that these businesses get the best of all worlds: an ability to proselytize to employees and inject their biblical worldview, but without the onus that true ministries have to actually improve the lot of the poor. Instead, they not only get to build their profit for their own comfort, but receive the benefit of tax write offs for giving parts of those profits to true faith-based organizations, who also then do not have to pay taxes because they are religious organizations and non-profits.

There have been over 100 lawsuits against the contraception coverage mandate in the Affordable Care Act, with a majority of them being filed by so-called “faith-based” businesses. In some cases, with religious educational institutions like Notre Dame, the affiliation makes sense. In others, such as Hobby Lobby, the designation becomes a little more tenuous. After all, does giving millions of dollars in profit to religious groups and organizations really mean that you yourself are a faith-based business? Or does it just mean you’re using your own specific belief system when you are trying to whittle down your profits in order to minimize your tax liability?
Although Adam was not an entrepreneur, the first thing God did when He created Adam was to give him a job (Genesis 2:15). We are created to work, to use our minds and our hands to subdue this world and rule over it (Genesis 1:28). Scripture praises industriousness and hard work (Proverbs 14:23; 31:27; Ephesians 4:28). By contrast, those who are idle are harshly reprimanded (Proverbs 19:15; 2 Thessalonians 3:6). We are instructed to make it our “ambition to lead a quiet life: You should mind your own business and work with your hands” (1 Thessalonians 4:11).
Still, the owner, Doug Erickson, insists it is a religious company because, when it was failing and he thought about selling them off, he “gave it over to God” and now it makes money. “Erickson believes that his role as President and majority shareholder of the Dealerships is that of a steward of a business given to him by God and that his employees are God’s children who are entrusted to his care. He regards it as his religious duty to operate the Dealerships in conformity with his religious beliefs,” states the complaint. It also notes that he believes his company is a “marketplace ministry,” meaning he evangelizes to his employees and customers — a fact that I’m sure some of his customers would no doubt prefer to be made aware of before coming to shop.
Think for a moment about selling a $49.95 e-book with 50% commission… you make $24.97 when you cause that websurfer to click their mouse button. Gee, if only you had a “plan of attack” to learn how to start your own Christian home-based business, instead of always chasing your tail and wondering where to start and what to do next! Ohhhh… wait a second. We offer that to you!
I highly respect those who subscribe to the school of thought that there should be nothing professional about Christian ministry. I understand where you’re coming from. I’ve read John Piper’s book, Brothers, We Are Not Professionals. It’s a great book. It reminds us that we’re not just here to analyze markets and produce numbers. I completely agree.
What if on top of that you had access to e-books, reports, video’s, software and tutorials to teach you everything you need to know about every type of Internet marketing and online prosperity that you could possibly need? What if you had products to promote and sell as your own? Then, what if you were taught how to create your own products for even more prosperity? Then, what if on top of all that you had a Christ-centered learning center to fully support your efforts? Even better, what if you’re cash poor and many of the marketing tactics you’re being taught didn’t cost you a penny? 
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