I'm glad you found the post fascinating, but I wonder how many Americans actually share my views. I know many take offense when people say that America is no longer a Christian nation, but at the very least it seems to be Christian in name only. The American attitude towards business, productivity, and the accumulation of wealth is much different than the rest of the world. As a nation, we seem to value these higher than health, family, and spiritual well-being.
What if you could earn $100 a day (and even much more), from promoting this very website online (and others like it)? What if you knew exactly how it was that so many of the self-described “guru’s” made over $100,000 per year simply by affiliate marketing other people’s products? What if you had access to the same knowledge that other “upscale guru’s” are known to charge $2,000 for in “one-on-one coaching seminars”? Do you think there would be any prosperity, or benefits from the knowledge of that in starting your own Christian home business?

The Internet has changed the world and opened up more opportunities for aspiring “prosperity’ers” than anything in history, and theChristiandude.com is the most ridiculously affordable, best, and most integrity-oriented, Christian, home-based business opportunity on the Internet! In fact, we are the only known for-profit, online, Christ-centered business opportunity, that not only provides an educational, resource and product center, but we also donate 10% of every, single dollar made to licensed, nonprofit, Christian ministries.

I used to work at a private university run by priests. Mobbing by the rector was the rule, greed and extorting money from students too, as well as finding ways of not paying the employees (for instance, although Christmas and Easter are bank holidays, they treated them as my personal leave and paid me less). And, as a priest, the rector behaves as if he were above the law. Or maybe it's the Vatican law he obeys, not the Polish law?
Does just being a “religious” owner of a company mean that you get to declare your business to be faith-based? Now, as new lawsuits against the mandate pile up, the correlation of what constitutes a religious business is getting more tenuous. A recent press release announcing yet another suit says it is being filed by a “faith-based car dealership” that says its religious beliefs are being violated by being forced to cover contraception in their health care plans.
Just Jewelry’s items range from $12 – $28, making it accessible to more people. To start selling as a Just Jewelry consultant, you must buy a $99 starter kit, valued at $241. With this kit, you receive a sample of their jewelry and a business kit. From the start, new consultants receive 30% discount on their jewelry collection and 10% discount on their boutique. Once you purchase $300 in jewelry and boutique, you start to receive a 50% discount on all jewelry purchases and 30% off boutique items. Another way to receive the bigger percentage immediately is to purchase the $399 starter kit, valued at $749. Included in this is $650 worth of jewelry, business kit, and a website and email account.
So is that what it takes to be a “faith-based” organization now? In some ways, it appears that these businesses get the best of all worlds: an ability to proselytize to employees and inject their biblical worldview, but without the onus that true ministries have to actually improve the lot of the poor. Instead, they not only get to build their profit for their own comfort, but receive the benefit of tax write offs for giving parts of those profits to true faith-based organizations, who also then do not have to pay taxes because they are religious organizations and non-profits.
Madam C.J. Walker is considered one of America’s first women to become a self-made millionaire. Born to former slaves, Walker faced a series of difficulties early in life. These included poverty, the death of her parents, and several failed marriages. Eventually she moved to Colorado and found work as a sales agent, which eventually inspired her to start her own business. She began to sell her own line of hair care products designed specifically for African-American women. At her peak, she ran a host of factories both in the United States and abroad. Walker spent a good deal of her life advocating for the rights of African-Americans and gave away much of her earnings both during her life and at her death. Recipients included the NAACP, the YMCA and YWCA, historical preservation projects, and civil rights causes.

Students pursuing licensing in fields that often require a master’s degree from a regionally accredited school, such as Counseling or Social Work. It is because of this reason that City Vision does not offer master’s programs in these fields. As listed above, regional master’s programs to date have always accepted our bachelor’s degrees, but the decision is up to each individual school.
Student pursuing academic careers, since many high-end schools may require Ph.D.’s from regionally accredited schools. A very small percentage of jobs (mostly academic) require regional accreditation.  For example, a recent search of jobs in Boston showed 19 jobs out of 65,645 total requiring regional accreditation (of which 18 were in academic institutions).
I'm glad you found the post fascinating, but I wonder how many Americans actually share my views. I know many take offense when people say that America is no longer a Christian nation, but at the very least it seems to be Christian in name only. The American attitude towards business, productivity, and the accumulation of wealth is much different than the rest of the world. As a nation, we seem to value these higher than health, family, and spiritual well-being.

Ultimately, choosing City Vision’s national accreditation over a regionally accredited school is a question of value: you get more for your money with City Vision. If you need the “gold plating” of regional accreditation for one of the reasons described above, then it may be worth paying 2-10 times more to get a degree with regional accreditation from another school. However, because of the career choices of our students, they prefer to choose the value of City Vision rather than more expensive high-end options.


Imagine for a second that you obtain an education becoming licensed as a general contractor and home-builder. You learn everything you need to know and have every feasible working knowledge and expertise as to what it takes to build a home. Well, you still have to buy materials, and supplies, as well as continuing education resources to learn masonry, and carpentry, and plumbing.
From a Christian social justice perspective, many have called the distinction between regional and national accreditation a cartel that is a major injustice that hurts the poor.  Having said that, there are those that still maintain this distinction, so we address their concerns in this section. This letter from Dr. Leah Matthews addresses some concerns about the quality of DEAC accreditation.
What if on top of that you had access to e-books, reports, video’s, software and tutorials to teach you everything you need to know about every type of Internet marketing and online prosperity that you could possibly need? What if you had products to promote and sell as your own? Then, what if you were taught how to create your own products for even more prosperity? Then, what if on top of all that you had a Christ-centered learning center to fully support your efforts? Even better, what if you’re cash poor and many of the marketing tactics you’re being taught didn’t cost you a penny? 
×